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Archive Autumn Sunset

An Autumn sunset from the rear of Vanguard West Ferry Road.   Over the Thames.

Archive Back To School

Level 2 now in place ready for the children to return to School after a long six week break.    It took just 2 days to crane the portacabins into place and connect to the level below!  The temporary  school may only be with us for another year as a new school is being built about a mile from Vanguard.

Archive W1 Self Storage

We are pleased to announce that Vanguard have acquired W1 Self Storage.

W1 is a cracking self-store based in the Harley Street Q Park car park, which can be found just off Cavendish Square in Central London. Here is a map to the store.

We will be updating our website shortly but in the interim if you need Central London Storage please get in touch with the team on 08082529252 .

 

 

Archive Millwall, home to Vanguard East London

Vanguard Self Storage East London is situated at 188 Westferry Road, Millwall, Isle of Dogs.  Below is a brief history of Millwall and Docklands.

The Seven Mills – Millwall

Seven windmills for the grinding of corn were built on the western side of the Isle of Dogs between 1680 and 1720, giving the area its name, Millwall.  The position of these 7 windmills are shown by the red box on the antique map below.

Isle of Dogs Windmills-page-001

The ‘wall’ was a great bank of earth and stones and dated back as far as the Roman era and was definitely in use in the early Middle Ages. This bank of earth kept the River Thames from flooding the island at high tide, allowing the surrounding land to be cultivated as farmland.  The wall was certainly wide enough for seven windmills and for the path that ran its length.  This path stretched around the peninsula towards the area now known as Blackwall.

The windmills, some of which had been used for grinding corn, disappeared in the early nineteenth century when wind power was replaced by the power of the steam engine. In their place, new factories sprang up along the wall which was strengthened and straightened at the river’s edge to allow ships and barges to be unloaded.

Docklands & Ship-Building

The 17th and 18th Centuries saw an increase in ship-building at nearby Blackwall and Limehouse.

This ship-building was a mark of the growing prosperity of London as a port. By the end of the 18th century, there were so many ships coming into London that there was barely room for them to unload and load safely on the quays and wharves of the port near the Tower of London.

The West India merchants, whose sugar ships came crowding up the river all at the same time, petitioned Parliament for permission to build enclosed docks across the northern end of the Isle of Dogs. The West India Docks were built and they opened in 1802 and traces of their once grand open vistas of water still survive, overshadowed now by the skyscrapers of Canary Wharf. Some of the original sugar warehouses have been turned into the Museum of London Docklands. 

In the years that followed the opening of the West India Docks, the western foreshore of the Island was developed with shipyards, barge builders, mast makers and iron works. http://www.museumoflondon.org.uk/museum-london-docklands

Skilled workers and labourers came to Millwall to live. Rows of cottages were built for them with very smart residences for the more affluent. There were new roads, shops, pubs and clubs.  The air resounded with the noise of industry and with the dialects from all parts of the United Kingdom.

The name “Millwall” became associated with the most advanced engineering of the day, leading to the construction of Brunel’s famous and ill-fated Great Eastern steamship, which was launched on 31st January 1858, the construction of which took place very close indeed to Vanguard’s site on Westferry Road.

Archive JILL TAKING ON THE LONDON MARATHON

My name is Jill Boorman and work at Vanguard Self Storage London East and I am taking on the mammoth challenge of completing my first London Marathon on Sunday 24th April.

After months of training runs, I will be among the expected 38,000 nervous and excited runners congregating on Blackheath for the start of this year’s London Marathon, I personally will be extremely nervous.

I have decided to use my place to raise funds for JDRF UK (Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation), a charity very close to my heart as I am a Type 1 Diabetic. JDRF UK need funds to continue their potentially life changing research into Type 1 (Insulin-Dependent) Diabetes.

As a Type 1 Diabetic training for the London Marathon, the long distance runs involved have proved to be a challenge all of their own at times!

If you would like to sponsor me and thank you very much if you do 🙂 here’s the link; http://uk.virginmoneygiving.com/jill-boorman-VMLM2016-43178 Please also leave a good luck message if you do sponsor me!

The marathon route will pass directly in front of Vanguard East London’s site at 188 Westferry Road and I will try and give it a nod as I pass by but I suspect that as this is just after the 16 mile mark of the run, I may be otherwise too pre-occupied/exhausted!

Runners must complete the full 26 miles, 385 yards before they run over the finish line at The Mall in Central London and finally lay their hands on their well deserved finisher’s medal.

The First London Marathon

The London Marathon was created after Chris Brasher, a former Olympic Champion, returned home from completing the New York Marathon. He was so moved by the sight of over one million people unified by one major challenge and this made him feel that London had to have its own marathon.

After studying other big city marathons, Chris Brasher established the London Marathon’s charity status. His dream was realised on 29th March 1981 with the first London Marathon and it proved to be an instant success.  

If you feel your own legs aren’t up to actually running a marathon but you’d still like to be part of the day and show your support, join the crowds to shout encouragement instead. Crowds of spectators line the whole 26.2 mile route but great viewing points can be found at Greenwich, the Isle of Dogs, The Highway, Tower Bridge, Embankment, Westminster and of course, the emotional finish of the Marathon on the Mall in front of Buckingham Palace.

PLEASE NOTE

OUR WESTFERRY ROAD DEPOT WILL BE CLOSED ON MARATHON DAY.  

NORMAL HOURS WILL RESUME ON MONDAY 27 APRIL 2015.  

GOOD LUCK TO ALL THOSE INVOLVED!

Archive MOTHERING SUNDAY – SUNDAY 6TH MARCH 2016

The UK’s celebration of Mothering Sunday stems from the 16th Century, when people returned to their mother church for the service of Refreshment Sunday, so called because the fasting rules of Lent were relaxed on that day.

As a result of this tradition, most mothers were reunited with their children because young apprentices and young women that were in domestic service were released by their masters for that weekend.  Children would pick wild flowers as they walked home for their church or to give them to their mother as a small gift.

At the start of the 19th Century the custom was still popular but the Industrial Revolution saw these traditions change and the Mothering Sunday customs declined.

People in the UK began to celebrate what we now know as Mother’s Day on the fourth Sunday of Lent, the same day on which Mothering Sunday had been celebrated for centuries.  The UK celebration has no connection to the American celebration of the same name.

Some of the Mothering Sunday customs were revived, such as the tradition of eating cake on that day, although celebrants now eat *Simnel Cake  instead of the cakes that were traditionally baked at that time.

The traditions of the two holidays are now fused together and celebrated on the same day, although many people are not aware that the celebrations have quite separate origins. UK-based companies saw the business opportunity of Mother’s Day and heavily promoted it in the UK and by the 1950’s it was celebrated across all of the UK

 Fact OR Fiction?

The name Simnel probably comes from the Latin word ‘Simila’, which means finest wheat flour usually used for baking cakes.

There is also a folk tale that a man called Simon and his wife Nell argued over whether a cake for Mothering Sunday should be baked or boiled.  In the end they decided to do both, so they named the cake after both of them, Sim-Nell!

Archive VALENTINE’S DAY, 14TH FEBRUARY

February 14th – Valentine’s Day

Valentine’s Day is celebrated every year on 14th February and some people believe this is to commemorate the anniversary of St. Valentine’s death or burial circa A.D. 270, others claim that the Christian church decided to place St. Valentine’s feast day in the middle of February in an effort to Christianise the Pagan celebration of Lupercalia (Lupercalia was a very ancient, possibly pre-Roman pastoral festival, observed on February 13 through 15, to avert evil spirits and purify the city, releasing health and fertility).

Valentine greetings were popular as far back as the Middle Ages but Valentine’s greetings as we know them now didn’t begin to appear until after AD 1400. The oldest Valentine text in existence today was a poem written in 1415 by Charles, Duke of Orleans, to his wife while he was imprisoned at the Tower of London following his capture at the Battle of Agincourt.  The Duchess died before the poem could reach her. Over the Duke’s 25 year imprisonment, he wrote his wife 60 love poems which are often said to have been the first “Valentines.”  This Valentine poem can bee seen at the British Library in Central London.  Several years after, it is believed that Henry V hired a writer named John Lydgate to compose a Valentine note for Catherine of Valois.

In Great Britain, Valentine’s Day began to be widely celebrated around the 17th Century. By the middle of the 18th Century, it was common for lovers and friends from all social classes to exchange small tokens of affection or handwritten notes. By 1900 printed cards began to replace written letters due to improvements in print technology. Ready-made cards were an effortless way for people to express their emotions in a time when direct expression of one’s feelings was discouraged. Cheaper postage rates also contributed to an increase in the popularity of sending Valentine’s Day greetings.

Happy Valentine’s Day from all at Vanguard Self-Storage

Archive INTERESTING FACTS FOR MILLWALL FC FANS

Millwall Football Team have had five different football ground locations during their history, four of which were on the Isle of Dogs, prior to the 1910 move to Cold Blow Lane, South of the River (River Thames).

Millwall Football Club’s birthplace was at the J.T. Morton’s Canning and Preserve Factory on Westferry Road (Nos. 2-4 on the river side of the road and Nos. 17-23 on the opposite side of the road to the river). A group of Tin Smiths (the ‘Tinnies’) decided to form a football club, calling themselves the Millwall Rovers.

Their first base was The Islander public house, 3-5 Tooke Street. The pub became the HQ for the football club and a social centre for the Millwall Rovers players. The pub was built around 1858 but was destroyed in an air-raid on 7 September 1940 and was never rebuilt. The location of The Islander public house where club held their meetings and the players would socialise is just 5 minutes walk from the Vanguard Self-Storage facility at 188 Westferry Road, London E14 3RY.

Millwall Rovers with the East London Cup, 1887
Millwall Rovers with the East London Cup, 1887

Archive 5 Silly New Year`s Eve Traditions

Christmas is almost over, but if you think it is also the end of amusing traditions, you are fortunately mistaken. New Year`s Eve is right on our doorsteps.
Oh no, silliness does not end there.

In Hungary, for example, it is widely believed that animals can speak on New Year`s Eve. Some people of lesser imagination blame it on all the alcoholic beverages. The Timewheel is one of the world`s largest hourglasses with its sixty ton granite and steel structure. The hourglass runs out on New Year`s Eve, and is rotated for the new year. Also, you can find at least one TV channel that airs Bud Spencer – Terence Hill movies all day long. Because they are that good.

There is a wonderful Belarus tradition where they are peeking into the future, in order to predict who gets married next. Foretelling the future requires a qualified expert. Or in this case, a rooster. The single ladies sit down in a circle, place piles of dry corn in front of them, then waiting begins. When the suspense reaches its apex, the epitome of fortune-telling, a rooster gets released.

In Spain, when the clock strikes Midnight, you eat a grape each time the bell chimes. Each grape will lead to a fantastic month in the new year, and they also ward you against bad spirits. It originates from Puerta del Sol, the busiest place in Madrid. Some people eventually attempt to stuff all the grapes in their mouth at once – a rather amusing sight.

In Denmark, the front steps are becoming almost as dangerous as a kids playroom full of LEGO. On New Year`s Eve, Danes throw dishes at their friends front door as a sign of affection. So if you find a lot of broken glass and shards when you step outside, it means they really like you. It is also excellent to counter wannabe burglars.

In Belgrade, Serbia, there is a lovely tradition which involves an Eastern Orthodox priest to throw a cross or a crucifix into the Danube. If you dive in and retrieve it, you will be healthy throughout the year. Once you have recovered from the cold you got in the icy water. Yeah.

Tradition is a wonderful phenomenon. It evolves, it adapts, you do not even realise them because they are part of your life. Rest assured, no matter where you go, you will find a silly local New Year`s Eve tradition.

Have a wonderful new year!

Archive High risk, high reward: crossing the Thames

The Force is strong with this one – they murmured when German daredevil Franz Burbach crossed the Thames. It is not a great achievement in itself.
But he did so on a tightrope, 100 meters upstream of Southwark Bridge in August 1972.

It was his second attempt; a year earlier he attempted to cross the river but dropped his balancing pole, turning the crossing attempt into a diving show on a very short notice.
This time a young lady has jumped on to the cable, dangling for a while before falling into the water with a well-deserved splash. Burbach was determined; he did not let the attention-seeker to spoil his show. He carried on and undertook the crossing of the Thames for the first time in history. At least on a rope. Said rope between Bear Wharf and Bull Wharf was a 35 mm diameter cable positioned and installed by Vanguard.

It was not last time our company has aided the real Skywalkers.
In 1997, American highwire walker Jade Kindar-Martin and the French Didier Pasquette have decided to cross the Thames again. Simultaneously. In opposite directions. Without a safety net, because safety nets are for whimps. It is safe to say they have elevated “high risk, high reward” to whole new level. The 18 mm cable we lifted was 400 meters long, and was positioned 30 meters above the water level. With exceptional aid from Special Forces Canoes, numerous cross ties were attached to improve horizontal stability.

history-1997

Everything was ready to go at seven in the evening. Thousands of spectators and a myriad of TV camera crew held their breath as the two began their dangerous journey towards each other. They met in the middle of the rope where Didier dropped to one knee, allowing safe passage. Then they continued the dramatic skywalk, and at half past seven, reached their destination as dry as a quality vodka-martini. They were celebrated with a thunder of applause and fireworks, setting a new Guinness World Record.

That was a real high class performance!

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Jill takes on the London Marathon

My name is Jill Boorman and work at Vanguard Self Storage London East and I am taking on the mammoth challenge of completing my first London Marathon on Sunday 24th April.

After months of training runs, I will be among the expected 38,000 nervous and excited runners congregating on Blackheath for the start of this year’s London Marathon, I personally will be extremely nervous.

I have decided to use my place to raise funds for JDRF UK (Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation), a charity very close to my heart as I am a Type 1 Diabetic. JDRF UK need funds to continue their potentially life changing research into Type 1 (Insulin-Dependent) Diabetes.

As a Type 1 Diabetic training for the London Marathon, the long distance runs involved have proved to be a challenge all of their own at times!

If you would like to sponsor me and thank you very much if you do :-) here's the link; uk.virginmoneygiving.com/jill-boorman-VMLM2016-43178 Please also leave a good luck message if you do sponsor me!

The marathon route will pass directly in front of Vanguard East London’s site at 188 Westferry Road and I will try and give it a nod as I pass by but I suspect that as this is just after the 16 mile mark of the run, I may be otherwise too pre-occupied/exhausted!

Runners must complete the full 26 miles, 385 yards before they run over the finish line at The Mall in Central London and finally lay their hands on their well deserved finisher’s medal.

The First London Marathon

The London Marathon was created after Chris Brasher, a former Olympic Champion, returned home from completing the New York Marathon. He was so moved by the sight of over one million people unified by one major challenge and this made him feel that London had to have its own marathon.

After studying other big city marathons, Chris Brasher established the London Marathon’s charity status. His dream was realised on 29th March 1981 with the first London Marathon and it proved to be an instant success.

If you feel your own legs aren't up to actually running a marathon but you'd still like to be part of the day and show your support, join the crowds to shout encouragement instead. Crowds of spectators line the whole 26.2 mile route but great viewing points can be found at Greenwich, the Isle of Dogs, The Highway, Tower Bridge, Embankment, Westminster and of course, the emotional finish of the Marathon on the Mall in front of Buckingham Palace.

PLEASE NOTE

OUR WESTFERRY ROAD DEPOT WILL BE CLOSED ON MARATHON DAY.

NORMAL HOURS WILL RESUME ON MONDAY 27 APRIL 2015.

GOOD LUCK TO ALL THOSE INVOLVED!
...

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